Dina Sarayra, Author at Kaleela

Author: Dina Sarayra

Welcome on board everyone! Today our destination is Arab Airport. This is a new airport to you, but has so much to offer. Please stow all luggage in the overhead bins and fasten your seatbelts. We would like to remind you that smoking is completely prohibited on board. The plane is ready for take-off. Let’s try this airport announcement in Arabic: . نرجو منكم وضع جميع الأمتعة في...

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In Arabic syntax and morphology, you’ll start seeing the Arabic grammar nouns, verbs, tenses, and all Arabic grammar rules differently. Welcome to Arabic grammar for beginners. Today is all about Arabic syntax and morphology. To make it easier, we have made some Arabic syntax vs English syntax references to get the grasp of it. Words in the Arabic syntax can be divided into nouns, verbs, or particles....

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Today’s lesson is about the Arabic vocative particle and this vocative particle is called yaa يا. What is the vocative particle? It is when you need to call someone. The Arabic vocative is called النداء /al nida’/, which literally means the calling. The verb of this is called ينادي  /yonadi/ which means (he) calls. It is often referred to as the Arabic vocative style which translates...

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Helping Vowels

Arabic vowels, similar to English ones, give a voice to the language. What’s a language without vowels, right? In Arabic, however, there are fewer vowels than English.   The rules concerning helping vowels are broken down to three. Once you recognize them, helping vowels are an easy A. It is all about the haraka of the proceeding vowel and the helping vowel. The Arabic Alphabet: Vowels lesson...

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How does Idaafa work?

Arabic rules in grammar are not as difficult if you follow the rules carefully. Unlike English, Arabic does not have too many roots from which the language has formed. English, for example, has words from Latin, Greek and even French roots. The same cannot be said about Arabic. This makes rules easy to understand. There are barely any exceptions to the general rules. So let...

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Searching for Arabic morphology online? Search no more. We have the basics covered here for you. Arabic verb morphology has rules that it abides by and if recognized, everything will fall into place. Let’s first define Arabic morphology which is referred to as صرف /sarf/ or تصريف /tasreef/ (the verb version of it). In Arabic morphology, some internal changes of a word take place and this...

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In our world today, we need to know all about the different countries, towns, and villages especially if you have the love for travel in your blood. Today is all about recognizing the different countries around the world. Let’s learn how to say country in Arabic, which means دولة /dawla/ or بلد /balad/.  “Your country” in Arabic, is بلدي /baladi meaning my country. We know that countries are...

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Personal pronouns in arabic

Our Arabic grammar lesson for today is all about pronouns. As you already know, pronouns are used to replace nouns in the English language. The same applies to Arabic. In this lesson, we are going to go over all three types of Arabic pronouns: personal, possessive, and demonstrative pronouns. Personal Pronouns Personal PronounsTransliterationNo.Meaningأنا/ana/SingularMeأنتَ/anta/ SingularYou (male)أنتِ/anti/SingularYou (female)هو/huwa/SingularHim (male)هي/hiya/SingularHer (female)نحن/nahnu/PluralWeأنتم/antom/PluralYou (male)أنتنَّ/antenna/PluralYou (female)هم/hom/PluralThem (male)هنَّ/honna/PluralThem (female) As you can see from the table,...

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In English, the article “the” is easily added to turn an indefinite noun into a definite one. Arabic does the exact same thing with the article al. The article “the” is the ال meaning in Arabic. You’ll find al in Arabic surnames, adjectives, and all nouns. To break it down, al is made of two Arabic letters: أ referred to as alif, and ل referred to as lam....

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Today is all about women. Many languages use some sort of feminine marker to refer to females.  The Arabic language is no different. Masculine in Arabic is مذكّر pronounced /muthakkar/ and feminine in Arabic is مؤنث pronounced /mo’annath/. The masculine has no marker, but the feminine is taken from the masculine version of the word, with a girl’s special sprinkle on it to make it appropriate...

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