Basic Arab Words used When You’re Angry in Dialectal Arabic - Kaleela

Basic Arab Words used When You’re Angry in Dialectal Arabic

Angry in Dialectal Arabic

Basic Arab Words used When You’re Angry in Dialectal Arabic

Hey, you’re human and as a human, you have a multitude of emotions that sometimes you just can’t control. Anger is one of them. Some can control their anger better than others by showing restraint and trying to diffuse whatever made them angry in the first place. Others show no restraint at all and let cuss words fly out of their mouth that would make the Devil himself blush with embarrassment.

We’re going to take the middle road in today’s lesson by restraining ourselves and learning Arabic words and phrases that probably won’t diffuse any situation, but may make you feel a lot better in the end. So, if you’re traveling around the Arab world and somebody has made you angry, let them know with these Arabic words and phrases.


شو هاد / shu hayda?

When something is just so crazy and unbelievable use this Arabic expression meaning, “What’s this?”  For example: “Shu hayda? Somebody’s slashed all four of my tires.”


خلص/ khalas

When enough is enough, say “khalas” or in English “Enough already!”.


اوف / ufff

Again, not so much a word but a cry of exasperation like we would make an angry sigh or that sound we make with our lips like a tired horse in English when we’re angry.


يا الله / ya allah

This is equivalent to the angry use of “Oh my God!”, as in “ya allah! You did not just go there and bring God into this argument!”


 عيب عليك/ haram aleik

This means “shame on you”  


طيب / tayeb

This means “Okaaaay” and is said through clenched teeth. Used with the actual “okay” hand gesture, it means “You better watch it because I will get you later. Okay?”


أَنتَ مبتسمع لي / enta mabtesmaʿle

“You’re not listening to me.” or  “Do you understand the words that are coming out of my mouth?”


انتبه لكلامك / intabih likalamik

“Watch your mouth.” Used when somebody is on the verge of insulting or really disrespecting you.


وقف / tawaqaf

 “Stop it.” When somebody is doing something really annoying or perhaps throwing a tantrum you say “waqaf”.


ما بدي احكي معك / ma bedi ahki maak

“I don’t want to talk to you.” The good old silent treatment works every time.


انت بتمزح معي/ʾenta betmzeh maʿaee?

 “Are you kidding me?” Usually they’re not.


هاد محبط  / had mohbet geddan

 “This is so frustrating.” You don’t have to necessarily be angry to be frustrated and it’s good to know that you can tell the difference.


اسكت  / iskot

This is a way of saying “Be quiet”. Stop talking  


People from Arabic speaking countries are a kind and hospitable people and Arab culture dictates that they be slow to anger. Thus, it is very rare that you’ll ever run into any situation where you’ll have to use these phrases. So, with that in mind, please calm down (تهدئة من فضلك / tahdiat min fadlik), relax (الاسترخاء / alaistirkha’) and be happy (كن سعيدا / kun saeidaan) knowing that we hope you never run into situation where you’ll use these words. However, if the occasion ever arises, you’ll know what to day in your defense.


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