Learning Arabic Words & Expressions

types of tree in arabic

Tree worship is very common worldwide, and Arab culture is no exception to that. In fact, arboreal references in holy books and rituals reflect the place of trees in cultures of millennia ago: their uses, the local species of importance, and moreover, their inspirational and symbolic significance based on the perception of the tree as a symbol of life. With the continuous influence of culture...

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Whenever going to an Arabic restaurant to have an Arabic breakfast, you would need to know how to ask for eggs in Arabic to have a proper breakfast

When you were a kid, you probably heard that fuTuur  “فطور” (breakfast) is the most important wajba  “وجبة” (meal) of the day. Maybe back then you started breakfast with a bowl of Hubuub al-fuTuur “حبوب الإفطار” (breakfast cereal). Now that you’re older you might start your day with just a cup of qahwa “قهوة” (coffee) with a little Haliib “حليب” (milk) and some sukkar“سُكر” (sugar) and...

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A proper Arabic conversation starts by asking the right question in Arabic. Check out our list of commonly used questions

Welcome back fellow language learners! We mentioned before that it’s summertime in the Middle East and what a great time it is to for you to get out and learn Arabic language conversation skills because the days are longer and there’s more native Arabic speakers to chit-chat with outsiders. In Arabic, chit-chat or small talk is known as kalaam khafiif (literally,“light talk”), and it plays a...

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You can practice your Arabic conversation skills anytime face to face. However, talking in Arabic on your mobile is different, your mate cannot see you.

No matter where you roam in today’s world, you probably take your mobile telephone  (الهاتف المحمول – alhatif almahmul) with you. Indeed, having your own (الهاتف – alhatif ) (phone) is an awesome and easy way to stay in touch with friends, make social arrangements, and plan other aspects of your life. With your (محادثة هاتفية – muhadathat hatifia) (cell phone), you can get in...

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Buying clothes can be a hassle, especially if you are in a foreign country and can't speak the language. Check this article about vocabulary and sizes

Whether you’ve started working in an Arabic speaking country and need a new suit or are just visiting and looking for a souvenir t-shirt, learning Arabic for ملابس malaabis (clothes) is essential for getting exactly what you want in your size. The following table shows you some vocabulary for clothes and accessories in Arabic: EnglishTransliterationArabicpantsbinTalبنطالshirtqamiisقميصcoatmi’TafمعطفdressfustaanفستانbeltHizaamحزامhatqubba’aقبعةsocksjawaaribجواربshoesHitha'aحذاءringkhaatimخاتمwatchsaa’aساعة Once you’ve found the clothing item that you are looking for, next you...

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One of the great things about traveling to Arabic-speaking countries is that most major cities have quite a few different methods of transportation methods to choose from. Though not as غير مكلف – ghyr mukalaf (inexpensive) as buses, سيارات الأجرة – sayarat al’ujra (taxis) offer a relatively cheap and quick way to get from one point to another. Making it easier still is the...

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With Eid al Adha approaching in just a few weeks, we thought this would be a great time to learn Arabic vocabulary for holidays. In addition, we’re going to give you a few greetings that you can learn to wish your friends who are celebrating a happy holidays in Arabic. In most Arabic speaking countries, there are two major holidays: Eid al-Fitr (عيد الفطر) and Eid...

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Saying Please in Arabic and Thank you in Arabic should be known, it's essential in everyday conversations. Your Arab friend would appreciate it.

My mother used to tell me that the English words “please” and “thank you” go a long way, meaning that using polite words will help you get what you want from other people. Thinking about this, I guess that is pretty much true in any language or culture. So, that’s the idea behind this post: how to say “please” and “thank you” in Arabic so...

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Our five senses – sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell – seem to operate independently, as though they are five separate and distinct modes of perceiving the world. In reality, however, they collaborate closely to enable the mind to better understand its surroundings. We can become aware of this collaboration under special circumstances, and Arabs seemed to have had an understanding of this a long...

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